Alumni News: Connor Clark

Connor Clark (BA English ’11) writes to us from his job at TickPick, an online marketplace for tickets, based in New York City. That’s Connor second from left.

What are you up to these days?
I’m the content manager/copywriter for TickPick, a tech startup (now eight years old) that is the only secondary ticket marketplace without service fees added on or rolled into the seller’s listed price. Think StubHub, but no fees tacked on at the end, which saves our customers money. My day-to-day role is to publish blogs that both aid our site’s SEO (search engine optimization) by effectively “announcing” new artists’ concert tours when tickets go on sale and also give fans information on how to get their tickets.
I’m also charged with keeping our site’s content fresh for upcoming artists and each of the four major sports to ensure that our site’s web pages where customers can buy tickets rank well on search engines like Google.
Do you have any thoughts on your English major, now that you’re out in the real world?
While I started as a support agent (think answering calls and emails from customers and sellers alike), my grammatical skills, honed largely at Saint Rose, have enabled me to grow into my current role that requires strong writing and copy editing ability. Emails that go out to hundreds of thousands of users are generally run through me to proofread before they get sent out by our CRM (customer relationship management) team.
The photo above is of a few colleagues and I, who were running an activation at Riot Fest in Chicago a few weeks back. We were there to promote the TickPick brand and increase awareness among rock fans in the Chicago market, and I was in charge of the whole thing. The more fans that know about #NoFees, the more loyal customers we’ll earn over competitors like StubHub and Vivid Seats, who charge more money for the same exact tickets. We were there to promote the TickPick brand and increase awareness among rock fans in the Chicago market, and I was in charge of the whole thing.
Keep on rocking and doing us proud, Connor!
Any news to share with the English Department community? Use the form to share your updates about publications, jobs, fellowships, awards, etc. 

Our English Major Internship Placements

Each semester, our seniors take English 494: English Internship to gain practical experience in applying their English major knowledge and skills in actual work environments.

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Each semester, our seniors take English 494: English Internship to gain practical experience in applying their English major knowledge and skills in actual work environments. Over the years, students have interned in the writing, research, drama, and literature fields, at such sites as newspapers, public relations offices, schools, assisting scholars on research projects, non-profit organizations, government agencies, theaters, literary magazines, and many other professional contexts.

It’s an invaluable opportunity to our students to be able to provide help in the day-to-day operations of an organization and learn a bit about that field.  For those organizations that take our interns, they get a little extra help—at no cost to their organization—and another set of hands on deck.

Here is a partial list of where English majors have worked as interns.

Patrick Camilleri  Northeastern Association of the Blind at Albany
Alexandria Clark   SUNY Press
Danielle Epting  The Troy Record
Meghan Kelley  The Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy
Rob Van Der Werken  Saint Rose Office of Institutional Advancement
Scarllet Veras   Downtown Albany Business Improvement District
Madison Penk-Masucci Saint Ambrose Catholic Church
Taylor Casey   Pine Hills Review
Shanell Hanna  Urban Aftermath
Samantha Karian  Northeastern Association of the Blind at Albany
Vincent Malatesta  Saratoga Automobile Museum
Tyler Murray    Gaming Insomniacs
Tyani Pope   Esther Massry Gallery
Julia Porzio   Office of New York State Senator Andrew J. Lanza
Teshia Sukhlal  Delirium Entertainment, NY
Nicholas Feeley  The Collaborative magazine
Jessica Murray   Northeastern Association of the Blind at Albany
Sunny Nowacki   Pine Hills Review

Congrats to Fall 2019 Senior Seminar Students!

It’s that time of the semester again. Let’s give a special congratulations to those The College of Saint Rose English majors who just handed in their Senior Seminar papers this week in Dr. Eurie Dahn’s class! Here is the list of seminar students and their paper titles.

Tori Felter, “Objectification and Sexuality of the Modernist Woman”

Christina Mattern, “Of Ghosts and Gods: Kurtz’s Divine Voice in Heart of Darkness

Lindsey McGowan, “The Politics of Witnessing in W.B. Yeats’ ‘Easter, 1916’ and Other Essential Poems”

Conor Meehan, “T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land: The Music of Poetry”

Sunny Nowacki, “The Language of Perspective and its Importance in Woolf’s To the Lighthouse

Lily Prashaw, “Abuse of Dewey Dell and Modernist Women Related to Sigmund Freud’s Psychoanalysis”

Ashley Richardson, “Lady Chatterley’s Lover: Lawrence’s Call for Change”

Nicole Toney, “Through Dark Eyes: Langston Hughes, Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance”

Jaakko Teräsranta, “Paterson as The Waste Land

Jessica Werner-DeLong, “Darl and the Depiction of Trauma in As I Lay Dying

Karlah Whyte, “Minds Ravaged by War: The Role of Death in As I Lay Dying

Daphne Williams, “Their Eyes Were Watching God: Not a Feminist Text” Tavayia Williams, “The Woman Mule”

Dr. Eurie Dahn, Associate Professor of English, Instructor

Alumni News: Carol Jewell

Carol H. Jewell (MFA ’16) writes, “I am thrilled to announce that five of my poems have been included in the just-published Smitten.”

Smitten: This Is What Love Looks Like: Poetry by Women for Women is edited by Candice L. Daquin and Hallelujah R. Huston and published by Indie Blu(e) Publishing.

Any news to share with the English Department community? Use the form to share your updates about publications, jobs, fellowships, awards, etc.

Alumni News: Alexandra Korcz

We recently caught up with Alexandra Korcz (BA English ’14), who writes in from New York City.

What are you up to these days?

I work at Penguin Random House in the audio department. My official title is Associate of Rights and Permissions for Penguin Random House Audio. It is my job to secure the cover art files and our permission to use them on an audiobook edition. In my current position, I get to work with artists, designers, literary agencies, stock houses, movie studios, and publishers all over the world.

Do you have any thoughts on your English major, now that you’re out in the real world?

One of the reasons I gravitated to the English major is that I love reading and writing and at a publishing house I get to do both! My English degree has taught me to think critically, analyze, and research. I do this in my professional life and in my personal life. Sometimes I’m analyzing a picture book contract or tracking down an artist Penguin Random House hasn’t worked with for over twenty years, and other times I’m just overanalyzing an email or researching a vacation destination. No matter what I’m doing, I’m definitely grateful for the skills my English major has taught me.

Great to hear from you, Alexandra–and an awesome photo of your office!

Any news to share with the English Department community? Use the form to share your updates about publications, jobs, fellowships, awards, etc. 

Alumni News: Brett Peterson

Brett Peterson (BA English ’11) writes in with an update. 

What are you up to these days? 

After working a handful of unfulfilling jobs during my early post-college years, I decided I needed to do what I was put on this earth to do rather than what society expected of me. I am now a self-employed writer, musician and artist, and enjoying every minute of it. My first book,  The Parasite From Proto Space and Other Stories, is coming out in January 2020 from Clash Books, and two more collections plus a novel are in the works. I’m also the lead vocalist, rhythm guitarist and principal songwriter for the sludge rock band Raziel’s Tree. My visual art: mostly surreal, abstract cartoons, decorates the covers of my books and albums. My poetry blog and links to everything I do can be found at jellyfishentity.wordpress.com.

Do you have any thoughts on your English major, now that you’re out in the real world?

I use the things I learned as an English major every single day of my life. From formatting manuscripts, to dealing with rejection, to knowledge of what constitutes good literature and how to write it: the professors of the College of Saint Rose English Department taught me everything I needed to know (and even stuff I didn’t need to know [Post-Structuralism, I’m looking at you!]) in order to become a successful writer. Without this knowledge, the trajectory of my life would have veered towards something arguably less than ideal. Any high school student or undecided freshman who appreciates good stories and other forms of language art should consider majoring in English at The College of Saint Rose. You will learn what quality literature is, how it’s made and how to make it yourself. I can’t recommend this program enough.

Awesome, Brett!

Any news to share with the English Department community? Use the form to share your updates about publications, jobs, fellowships, awards, etc.

Pine Hills Review Fall Launch Reading at Hellman Library November 22

Pine Hills Review, the literary journal of The College of Saint Rose, invites you to a fall launch reading with four of our contributors: Olivia Dunn, Danielle Epting, Penny Perkins, and Karen Schoemer. Student editors will open reading work from Pine Hills Review‘s pages. And it’s all happening at the Neil Hellman Library!

The details follow!

Friday November 22 7pm
Neil Hellman Library
The College of Saint Rose
392 Western Avenue Albany, NY 12203
Free and open to the public

ABOUT THE FEATURED READERS:

 

Olivia Dunn is a Teaching Professor of English at Skidmore College. Her work has appeared in The Pinch Journal, Seneca Review, Entropy, JMWW, The Nervous Breakdown, River Teeth, and McSweeney’s. http://oliviakdunn.com/

Danielle Epting (B.A. English 2017) is a student in the MA Program at the University at Albany. She has published creative work along with news and feature stories in The Record. You can find her creative work published in various journals such as Nailed Magazine, Thought Catalog, The Airgonaut, etc. And, if you can find her pinky knuckles, she will be your very best friend, as she doesn’t seem to have any. https://danielleepting.com/

Penny Perkins has an MFA in Creative Writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, NM. Her short story, “Car Ride Through Corn Fields (1975),” was chosen by Manuel Muñoz as the winner of Beecher’s Magazine‘s 2014 Fiction Contest. Recent short stories have been published in Waxwing and HOAX. Other publication credits for fiction, poetry, and non-fiction include Salon, Conditions, The Portable Lower East Side, Curves, Girlfriend No. 1, and Book. https://pennyperkins.weebly.com/

Karen Schoemer’s poetry has appeared in Pine Hills Review, Hobo Camp Review, La Presa and Up the River. She is vocalist for the bands Sky Furrows and Jaded Azurites. Her music journalism has been widely published and anthologized; her book Great Pretenders: My Strange Love Affair with ’50s Pop Music was published in 2006. A recent graduate of the Writer’s Foundry MFA program in Brooklyn, she is working on her debut poetry collection, Third Nature.