English Club Events!

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Hey Everyone,

I  hope you all had an awesome weekend. This past week in English Club we played around with fold over stories, and the results were so much fun to read aloud! This upcoming week we will be meeting from 3:30pm- 4:30pm. Be prepared to talk about your favorite book, or one of your favorites, and be ready to do some more fun writing exercises!
Here are some of our upcoming events:
September 27, 2019:  (at normal meeting time) We will be having a collaboration with Daniel Nester about the Pine Hills review and the world of literary journals. It’s a great way to get insight in this field, especially if you are thinking of going into it, or even eventually publishing things. See the flyer for more info!
October 30, 2019: BLAZE Pizza Fundraiser from 6:00-9:00pm! Come out to the BLAZE Pizza in Stuyvesant Plaza, show the flyer that I have attached below, and 20% of the proceeds from your meal be given to the Enlish Club!
I hope to see you all on Friday!
From,
Sam Zimmerman
English Club President
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Pine Hills Review general interest meeting September 27

Want to learn about the world of online literary journals?
Looking to gain experience editing or using social media?
Or do you want to curate and publish photos and art?

Then consider joining the editorial staff of Pine Hills Review, the literary magazine published right here at The College of Saint Rose. We talk about writing and you get experience for your resume. Plus it’s fun!

This meeting will take place during the English Club’s regular meeting time, on Friday, September 27, 3:30pm in Albertus 301.

For more info, email Prof. Daniel Nester at nesterd at strose.edu

English Alum Zackary Petker in Saint Rose Magazine!

Our own Zackary Petker, a 2017 graduate with a double major in English and Adolescence Education, is featured in the latest edition of Saint Rose Magazine in a story covering careers in education, “A Class of Our Own: Saint Rose steps up to fill need for teachers with graduates who believe in the field.”

The first few paragraphs:

As far back as elementary school, Zackary Petker recalls wanting to be a teacher. When it was time to choose a college, the Long Island native visited Saint Rose on a friend’s recommendation, fell in love with it, and immersed himself in the education program.

Petker did his teacher observation hours in an Albany middle school and continued another three years, even though he didn’t have to. He tutored at an afterschool program and used an undergraduate research grant to evaluate various approaches to teaching. In May 2017, he graduated cum laude with a degree in adolescence education. By the fall, he had a job, teaching at Hackett Middle School, where he’d done his observation. During his first year of teaching, Petker also earned his master’s degree in curriculum and instruction at Saint Rose.

“When I was growing up, it was the recession, and teachers were being let go, and people were discouraged from going into the field,” said Petker, now 24, who teaches English at Hackett’s college and career-readiness program. “Now, it’s 100% changed. There aren’t enough bodies to fill the jobs. People need to come into teaching.”

Today, as the economy has recovered, older teachers have started retiring, and there are not enough replacements.

Read the whole story here.

English Club Meets Friday

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First meeting of the semester will be Friday September 6th in Albertus 301 from 3.30-4.30 pm. See you there!

English Club: Books & Brews / ENG 218 Poetry Reading

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This Thursday at 5:30 pm in Albertus 369, English Club will be holding their last meeting of the year. We will be reviewing on this past semester and this past year, talking about ways that we can improve the club for next year.

English Club Meets April 25

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This Thursday, English Club will hold a meeting at 5:30pm in Albertus room 369. We will go over our final event for the semester, as well as our outcomes for our two past fundraisers. We will also be speaking of future events.

Hope to see you all there!

After our elections I figured that I should congratulate our new e-board for English Club for the 2019-2020 academic year. The e-board positions are as follows:
Treasurer: Gabrielle Martinez
Vice President: Karila Warner
President: Samantha Zimmerman
We are still looking for someone to be the secretary for the English Club, so if you are interested in what that entails, please send me an email!

Sam Zimmerman
English Club Vice President

Visiting Scholar: John Keene

Jersey City, NJ. Sept 18th 2018. John Keene writer shot in and around Jersey City for the John D. and Catherine T. Macarthur Foundation.

Photo via MacArthur Foundation

John Keene: ‘Counternarratives’

7 pm April 24th
Carondelet Symposium, Lally Hall, 3rd Floor

We are delighted to host 2018 MacArthur fellow John Keene as our visiting scholar for the 2018-9 academic year. He will be speaking the evening after our department symposium (beginning at 9am in Midnight Eats). From the MacArthur Foundation press materials:

John Keene is a fiction writer exploring the ways in which historical narratives shape contemporary lives while simultaneously re-envisioning these narratives from the perspectives of those whose voices have been suppressed. Through innovations in language and form, he imbues with multifaceted subjectivities those who have been denied nuanced histories within the story of the Americas—primarily people of color and queer people—and exposes the social structures that confine, enslave, or destroy them.

His first book, Annotations (1995), is simultaneously a semi-autobiographical novel chronicling the coming of age of a black, queer, middle-class child in the 1970s and ‘80s in St. Louis and a collection of essays about the ideological, philosophical, and political contexts that define his struggle to achieve agency. In the story collection Counternarratives (2015), Keene reimagines moments, both real and fictional, from the history of the Americas, adopting the language and literary forms of the time periods in which his characters live—from seventeenth-century epistolary novels to Modernist and post-modernist experiments with stream of consciousness.  One story, “Gloss on a History of Roman Catholics in the Early American Republic,” is framed as an excerpt from a history book. As the text unfolds, it is revealed that what at first appears to be a footnote about the disappearance of a convent school in early nineteenth-century Kentucky is in fact the eyewitness account of Carmel, an enslaved girl who achieves literacy and a literary voice within the space of the work. “A Letter on the Trials of the Counterreformation in New Lisbon,” also narrated by an enslaved person, turns a letter between missionary priests into an assertion of queer African presence in the New World. In “Rivers,” Keene imagines two meetings between an older Huckleberry Finn and a now-free Jim; he endows Jim with a voice and consciousness, thereby presenting Tom Sawyer and Huck from a powerful new perspective that extends and transforms Twain’s original novels.

In his fiction and in a number of other projects spanning translation, poetry, and cultural criticism, Keene is correcting and enlarging our distorted, partial views of American history and culture, and challenging his readers to question received understandings of our past.

BIOGRAPHY

John Keene received an A.B. (1987) from Harvard University and an M.F.A. (1997) from New York University. Before joining the faculty at Rutgers University-Newark, where he is currently professor and chair of the Department of African American and African Studies and a professor in the Department of English, he taught at Brown University and Northwestern University, among other institutions. He was a member of the Dark Room Collective and is a graduate fellow of Cave Canem. In addition to his novels, he has published two collaborative volumes of poetry, Seismosis (2006) and GRIND (2016), a chapbook of poems, Playland (2016), and translated Brazilian author Hilda Hilst’s novel Letters from a Seducer, from Portuguese. His writing has appeared in TriQuarterly, the Kenyon Review, and Ploughshares, among other journals.