English Courses Summer/Fall 2019

cropped-gold-square-logo-1140x1140.pngAdvisement day is upon us! Here’s the current list of summer and fall course offerings in English (subject to change but we hope it doesn’t change much):

English course descriptions, Summer and Fall 2019

Summer

ENG 116-IM: Professional Writing. Laity. Fully online.

May immersion, 5/14-6/1

This course will help students think about writing as a profession as well as an art, to learn how to seek out markets and to develop an adaptive flexibility in their writing styles, while building an online portfolio of work to showcase those skills. (L05)

 

ENG 126-IM: Native American Storytelling. Rice. Fully online.

May immersion, 5/14-6/1

This course will explore Native American oral tales from a variety of tribes and regions. We will read many types of stories, such as origin stories, trickster tales, and culture hero tales. Of interest will be the cultural purposes and meanings of oral tales as we examine character, structure, theme, and style in each tale. This course may be taken more than once, provided it addresses a different topic when taken again. Fulfills diversity requirement. (L04)

 

ENG 126-IM-2: Native American Storytelling. Rice. Fully online.

May immersion, 5/14-6/1

This course will explore Native American oral tales from a variety of tribes and regions. We will read many types of stories, such as origin stories, trickster tales, and culture hero tales. Of interest will be the cultural purposes and meanings of oral tales as we examine character, structure, theme, and style in each tale. This course may be taken more than once, provided it addresses a different topic when taken again. Fulfills diversity requirement. (L04)

 

ENG 251-IM: Nonfiction Writing. Nester. Fully online.

Practice in one or more prose forms with attention to strategies for revision and editing. Particular semesters will focus on specific types of writing, such as memoir, biography, journal writing, travel pieces, local histories, or personal essays. This course may be taken more than once, provided it addresses a different topic when taken again. Some research may be required. Prerequisite: ENG105 or equivalent. (L05)

 

Fall 2019

ENG 105. Multiple listings

An introduction to college-level writing and research. Emphasis on informative and persuasive writing and speaking across a range of situations, audiences, and forms. Instruction in substantial research paper. Students must receive a grade of C or better to satisfy this Liberal Education requirement. (L01)

 

Texts and Contexts: Lesbian Literature. Paster-Torres. TH 1:05-2:20.

Introduction to lesbian literature through fiction, poetry, essays, and more. We will explore literature written by, about, and for lesbians. We will examine these writings within their social, political, and cultural contexts, including the intersections of race, class, and gender. Readings may include works by Leslie Feinberg, Virginia Woolf, Nancy Garden, and Alice Walker. (LO4)

 

ENG-106-EL1: Texts and Contexts: Coming of Age: An exploration through Film, Fiction, and Memoir. Fitzsimmons (4) MW 1:15-2:30

This class will examine selections that explore personal and cultural rituals and rites of passage negotiated on journeys of self-discovery during this transition into adulthood. The course will include attention to diverse communities, addressing social, political, and historical themes expressed in the works. We will examine issues of race, gender, and multicultural perspectives. (LO4)

 

Texts and Contexts: Ecofeminism. Paster-Torres. TH 2:30-3:45

Introduction to ecofeminist literature through fiction, poetry, essays, and more. We will explore the origins and theories of ecofeminism; examine women’s connection to the earth and its non-human life; and discuss the relationship between the treatment of our planet and the treatment of its women. Readings may include works by Ursula Le Guin, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, and Margaret Atwood. (LO4)

 

ENG 106-EL Games and Modern Culture. Seelow. TR 1:05-2:20

Games both shape and are shaped by culture. Video games are now the largest form of mass entertainment in the world, but they are also applied to education, health, training and battle readiness. This course will be a combination hands on-discussion/theory-based course on the emergence of modern games from the early 1970s arcade games to contemporary Multiple Massive Online Role-Playing Games. We will explore games through the lens of play theory, culture studies, game studies, psychoanalysis, gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality and formal design. During the course will both play and study a variety of games including board games, card games, mobile, online, console, and virtual reality games. Additionally, the course will discuss games in learning, games for change, games and scientific research, and games for health. It will be also be taught in a gamified fashion. (LO4)

 

ENG-106  Superheroes and the Millennial. Seelow. TR 2:30-3:45

The film and video game industries has helped reimagine American superheroes for the millennial generation. This course explores the significance superheroes from the transmedia perspective of cinema, television, video games, comics, graphic novels, fan culture, and the web. This course is designed in an innovative game-based format. (LO4)

 

ENG 106: Texts and Contexts: The Art of the Internet: A Survey of Web-based Film/Television, Literature/Art, and Music/Gaming. Ely. TR 1:05-2:20

This course will examine web-based Art in the Age of the Internet. It will also examine the challenges and successes that come with being a “creator” in the rapidly evolving landscape of creative marketing. To be clear, this is not a technical course. We won’t be learning how to use web-based platforms, or web-based marketing strategies. Rather, we’ll examine how they are being used by “creators” to disseminate unique content, reach broad audiences, generate funding and even profit. Drawing from two main works of Non-fiction by Amanda Palmer and Cory Doctorow, both of whom explicitly detail their own successes and failures in this burgeoning field, students will analyze content in a variety of genres. We’ll look at early web-comics such as Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal (2002-), crowd-sourced art projects like HitRecord (2005,2010) and ExplodingDog (2000-2015), web-based film and tv such as Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along-Blog (2008) and Broad City (2009-2011), internet sensations like The Oatmeal (2009) and XKCD: Volume 0 (2009), highly successful crowdfunding projects in the Music and Gaming industry, and finally, we’ll have an “adventure of our own choosing” by reading and analyzing Zach Weinersmith’s Trial of the Clone (A 2012 novel fully funded on Kickstarter). Students will write a 5-6-page research paper on any one of the genres analyzed in our survey and they will also collaborate to create a short example of one. (LO4)

 

ENG 106: Txts&Cntxts: Madness and 19C Am Lit. Cosentino. MW 9:00-10:15

What causes madness, and is madness always obvious? At what point must the “fine line” be drawn to distinguish between creativity and catastrophe? To what extent do the worlds that we construct for ourselves motivate our desire to act upon impulse(s), no matter how unreasonable they may seem to a “normal” thinker? Where does the dividing line between reality and illusion get blurred? To what degree does an author’s environment and personal history influence his/her work? The texts we will read in this course will provide the substance to fuel discussion toward considering these (and other) inquiries. This course will utilize the poems and short stories of 19th century American writers whose work focuses on themes of darkness, psychosis, anxiety, competition, and distress. Students will perform close readings of the texts and apply those readings to class discussion, writing assignments, and connections to critical/scholarly work about the texts they are reading. The first half of the course will be dedicated to the work of Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Kate Chopin; the second part of the term will deal exclusively with the work of Edgar Allan Poe. (LO4)

 

ENG 106. Txts&Cntxts: Horror Lit/Film. Keller. TR 9:25-10:40

Topics course that introduces students to the interpretation and appreciation of a wide range of literary texts. Students acquire knowledge of genre and historical contexts as well as skills necessary to read literature closely, think critically, conduct research, and communicate orally and in writing. This course may be taken more than once, provided it addresses a different topic when taken again. (L04)

ENG 112: Introduction to Literary Studies. Morrow.

TR 9:25-11:07

TR 11:15-12:57

Introduction to a number of the central concepts and concerns of literary study, with specific attention to genre conventions and interpretive methodologies. Students work across historical eras and cultural traditions to develop the reading, writing, research, and oral communication skills necessary for further literary study. Course intended for English and English: Adolescence Education majors; should be taken as early as possible. Students may not take both ENG 112 and ENG 114. 

ENG 114: Intro to Literary Study of Genres and Traditions. Butler. MW 10:25-11:40

Introduction to the field-specific concerns of literary study for English /Language Arts concentrators. Focus on the historical development and technical conventions of literary genres. Exploration of methodologies of literary criticism/theory. Practice in reading, research, writing, and oral communication skills as needed for literary study. Course is intended for students in the English /Language Arts concentration; should be taken as early as possible. Students may not take both ENG 112 and ENG 114. Fall, Spring

 

ENG 114: Intro to Literary Study of Genres and Traditions. Chan.

MW 11:50-1:05

MW 1:15-2:30

Introduction to the field-specific concerns of literary study for English /Language Arts concentrators. Focus on the historical development and technical conventions of literary genres. Exploration of methodologies of literary criticism/theory. Practice in reading, research, writing, and oral communication skills as needed for literary study. Course is intended for students in the English /Language Arts concentration; should be taken as early as possible. Students may not take both ENG 112 and ENG 114. Fall, Spring

 

ENG 115: Intro to Digital Media. Marlow. MW 10:25-11:40

This course is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to analyze and evaluate a variety of media, and to participate in their circulation. Course materials highlight a variety of intersecting theoretical approaches (e.g. aesthetics, media history, economic impact, cultural critique, national identity, reception/audience studies) and an array of platforms (e.g., narrative film, avant-garde cinema, blogs, podcasts, digital video, and other emerging technologies). Emphasis on developing critical media literacies through analysis, research, and writing/composing. (L05)

 

ENG 126: Divs Voices: Immigrant Narratives. Palecanda. TR 4:15-6:00

This course addresses issues of race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc. in literature and/or film. Attention will be given to historical, socio-cultural, and political factors that inform these issues and texts. This course may be taken more than once, provided it addresses a different topic when taken again. Fulfills diversity requirement. (L04)

 

ENG 126: Diverse Voices: Race and Contemporary Literature. Shavers.

TR 2:30-4:12

MW 4:15-6:00

This course addresses issues of race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc. in literature and/or film. Attention will be given to historical, socio-cultural, and political factors that inform these issues and texts. This course may be taken more than once, provided it addresses a different topic when taken again. Fulfills diversity requirement. (L04)

 

ENG 180: Theatre Arts. Lieder. T/H 1:05-2:20

An introduction to drama and the theatre. Course explores theatrical experience from the various points of view of those who participate in it, such as the playwright, director, actors, designers, and audience. Class activities include reading dramatic literature, learning about the theatre, experimenting through performance, and attending dramatic performances. (L05)

 

ENG 206: Creative Writing. Nester (4). This course is fully online.

An introductory course in creative writing with practice in and critique of fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, and poetry, as well as readings in and discussions of each genre. Recommended for students with any level of creative writing experience. Prerequisite: ENG 105 or equivalent. (L05)

 

ENG 212: Survey of American Literature. Ungar. TR 2:30-4:12

Building on ENG 112‘s (or 114’s) emphasis on literary genres and interpretive methods, Survey of American Literature continues to prepare students for literary study at the 300 level. Through the study of a range of texts, students will become better acquainted with significant movements and periods in colonial American and U.S. literary history. Transatlantic and global literary and cultural relations will be explored. English and English Adolescence Education majors are required to take ENG 210, ENG 211 or ENG 212 and are urged to do so in the second year. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or 114.

 

 ENG 216-01 and 216-02: Growing Up Black in the United States. Dahn.

TR 9:25-11:07

TR 11:15-12:57

In 1903, the influential African American intellectual and leader W.E.B. Du Bois declared that white Americans often approach him (and other black people) with the question: “How does it feel to be a problem?”  In this course, we will examine what this problem is and what it feels like by analyzing what it means to grow up black in the United States.  How do people learn the lessons of what it means to be black during the Jim Crow period, a time of legalized segregation?  Throughout the course, we will pay careful attention to the intersections of race, class, and gender.  Authors will include Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Zora Neale Hurston. (LO4)

 

ENG 218: Oral Interpretation of Literature. Chepaitis (4) MW 4:15-6:00 p.m.

Development in theory and practice of the skills of reading aloud to present informed sharing of literary selections, increase understanding of literary works, and provide enjoyment to reader and audience. Presentations include prose, poetry, and drama. (LO5)

 

ENG 227: Writing and Women: Performing Feminisms. TR 11:15-12:57

Examines a range of artistic works produced by women after 1800. Readings may include various genres such as the novel, drama, poetry, nonfiction prose, film, and/or music. Course focuses on how women?s experiences and their artistic responses are shaped by conditions such as ethnicity, geography, politics, class, sexual orientation, work, education, and physical ability. Fulfills diversity requirement. (L04)

 

ENG 227: Women Authors/Filmmakers. Osborne.  MW 2:40-3:55

This course will explore the contributions of six women filmmakers to modern and contemporary English-language cinema. We will study the ways that these women have gone about the art and business of filmmaking within the contexts of established studio systems and the independent film. The six directors we will study are Kathryn Bigelow, Lisa Cholodenko, Ava DuVernay, Maggie Greenwald, Julie Taymor, and Chloé Zhao; we will study one film by each of these directors in depth. These six directors as well as filmmakers such as Sofia Coppola, Nora Ephron, Mary Harron, Amy Heckerling, Karyn Kusama, Patty Jenkins, Kimberly Peirce, and Dee Rees will be represented in an extended list of filmmakers and their films from which students will select works for their film review and final essay assignments. (L04)

 

ENG 228: Contemporary Fiction. Palecanda.

TR 9:25-11:07

TR 11:15-12:57

This course examines short stories and novels written after 1980. In addition to primary concerns in assigned texts, course also pays attention to genres, audience, technologies, and markets that shape contemporary texts. Fulfills diversity requirement. (L04)

 

English 231: The Scary and the Scandalous in Nineteenth-Century British Fiction

Chan. W 6:15pm-8:45pm

Increasing advances in scientific knowledge and increasing population shifts led fiction writers to consider the effects on all levels of British society. While technological advances could bring immense wealth to individuals, the human costs of advancement could be felt widely. In this course we will read novels that question the rapid pace of developments in science, technology, and imperial wealth. Possible readings include Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, The Time Machine by H.G. Wells, and The Beetle by Richard Marsh. (LO4)

 

ENG 235: Latinx literature. Anicca. ALB 303

T 6:15-8:45

H 6:15-845

This course is an introduction to Latinx literature of the United States organized around concepts that shape the works of Latinx authors, including border thinking, gender and sexuality, bilingualism, mestizaje, diaspora, and the transnational experience. Our readings include fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and reportage from writers from various Latinx groups, including Mexican Americas, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and Dominican Americans. Historical documents; critical essays; and other artistic forms, such as film or visual art, will supplement the primary literature. Students will be required to engage critically with primary texts, including reflecting on the ways in which these texts are in conversation with political and social realities, both historical and contemporary. The course methodology is student-centered, meaning guided student participation is the primary component. Activities include interactive lecture, team tasks, small and large group discussions, and online assignments. This course meets both online and in-person. Assignments include reading responses and/or quizzes, student facilitation, and a final research-driven essay. Fulfills the Diversity requirement. (LO4)

 

ENG 246-EL1: Imaginative Writing: Practice and Pedagogy. Kirkpatrick (2) T 6:15-9:50 p.m. (First half of the semester)

This course uses a workshop method to introduce students to the writing of poetry, playscripts and short fiction, as well as to effective methods for teaching creative writing. Students read literary texts in the genres and compose their own imaginative works. Workshops promote discussion and critique of student work. Prerequisite: ENG 105 or equivalent.

 

ENG 247-01 Nonfiction Writing Workshop: Practice and Pedagogy. Kirkpatrick (2) T 6:15-9:50 p.m. (Second half of the semester)

This course uses a workshop method to introduce students to the writing of literary prose, including personal essay, experimental essay and first-person narratives. The course will also address methods for teaching prose writing. Students read literary prose and compose their own prose works. Workshops promote discussion and critique of student work. Prerequisite: ENG 105 or equivalent.

 

ENG 251: Flash Nonfiction and Prose Poetry. Nester. Fully online

Flash nonfiction, prose poetry, lyric essay—no matter what we call it, writing that combines the lyric qualities of poetry and the immediacy of short prose has gained prominence in recent years, winning prizes and even landing on bestseller lists. In this workshop course, we will read and write pieces that experiment with form, embrace fragments and sections, avoid easy or smooth narrative, leap and juxtapose language, and even imitate other forms—from aphorism, fragment, and memoir to collage, fable, lists, and hermit crab writing. We will discuss some of the traditions and impulses that inform flash nonfiction writing as we read and revise.

 

ENG 252: Writing for Digital Media. Laity. This course is fully online.

This course will explore effective writing in digital media venues and social media. From the personal to the professional, this course will explore all aspects of digital media and the related writing processes including collaborative writing. Students may examine the history of digital and social media while they gain experience writing for blogs, websites and social networking sites. Prerequisite: ENG 105 or equivalent. (L05)

 

ENG 253: Introduction to Digital Publishing. Laity. This course is fully online.

This course will introduce the processes of digital publishing with an emphasis on practical skill building. Students will survey the history of the book as a technology for information, examine the typical requirements for copy editing at a professional level, then work through the basic steps of producing a simple ebook including attention to design and layout. Prerequisite: ENG 105 or equivalent. (L05)

 

ENG 260-EL1 Earlier Shakespeare. Butler (4) MW 9:00-10:15

This course will address, in the context of early modern English society and culture, histories and comedies written during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603).The exploration of Shakespeare’s language and literary devices, of genres, and of theatrical practices will be supplemented by attention to early modern social issues and ideology, as well as to present-day critical trends. (L04)

ENG 261: Later Shakespeare. Sperry (4) MW 2:40-3:55

This course will address, in the context of early modern English society and culture, tragedies and tragicomic romances written during the reign of King James I (1603-1625). The exploration of Shakespeare?s language and literary devices, of genres, and of theatrical practices will be supplemented by attention to early modern social issues and ideology, as well as to present-day critical trends. (L04)

 

ENG 280: History of Drama. Lieder. TR 4:15-6:00

Study of dramatic literature in eastern and western cultures, from its beginnings to the nineteenth century. Through an analysis of texts, stage methods (including costuming, make up, props, scenery, sound effects, and characterization), and audience response, this course investigates how the theatre of specific eras has shaped dramatic literature. Students will review theatrical productions as well as dramatic texts. (L05)

 

ENG 285: Acting: Studio Study. MW 4:15-6:00. Ryan-Ledtke.

Introduction to dramatic performance through acting exercises. This course offers strategies and approaches to characterization, improvisation, and play analysis. Students will learn to work under direction on stage through monologues and scenes. (L05)

 

ENG 290: Drama Production and Performance. Ryan-Ledtke. 0-1 credits.

F 1:00-4:20

Practicum in play production. While working with the drama director to prepare the play productions for the semester, students become involved in a wide variety of stage activities, including costuming, makeup, props, scenery, sound effects, and character portrayal. A minimum of 75 hours of commitment is required. Course may be taken more than once.

 

ENG 295: Writing: Short Course for Teachers (1). Marlow.

Course meets Friday Nov. 15th 5:00-9:00pm Saturday Nov 16th 9:00am-3:00pm and Sunday Nov. 17th 1:00-3:30pm

A workshop course focused on the fundamentals of the writing process including: brainstorming, drafting, revising, and editing. Designed for education majors. This course may be taken more than once, provided it addresses a different topic when taken again. Pass/fail.

 

ENG 311: Writing Creative Nonfiction. Nester. MW 4:15-6:00

A workshop in writing creative nonfiction. The focus in a particular semester may be on personal essay, memoir, literary/aesthetic essay, first-person journalism, or experimental forms. Readings in theory of creative nonfiction as well as a variety of creative nonfiction writers will round out the course. This course may be taken more than once, provided it addresses a different topic when taken again. Fulfills writing-intensive requirement. Prerequisites: ENG 105 and 200-level English or Communications writing course, or consent of the instructor based on writing sample.

ENG 312: Writing Poetry. Ungar. TR 4:15-6:00.

Exploration of various forms and modes of poetry, through specialized and free-form assignments, in-class critiques, individual conferences, and compilation of a portfolio of work. Some attention to poetic theory and the process of submitting work for publication. Knowledge of the genre and college-level creative writing experience expected. Fulfills writing-intensive requirement. Prerequisites: ENG 105 and 200-level English writing course, or consent of the instructor based on writing sample.

 

ENG 320: The 19th-Century American Novel. Sweeney. MW 9:00-10:15. ALB 301

“In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?” When Sydney Smith posed this rhetorical question in the Edinburgh Review in 1820, many American readers were likely to agree with the implied answer: virtually nobody. Many of the nineteenth-century American writers we have been taught to think of as “major” had relatively few readers–certainly few paying ones–during their lifetimes, while by far the most popular novelist in antebellum US was the Englishman Charles Dickens.  Moreover, the novel as a genre suffered from a good deal of suspicion in the early years of the republic, with “founding fathers” like Benjamin Rush warning that fiction destroyed the ability to discern truth from reality and was therefore bad for democracy. This is only one reason so many early American novels blurred the lines between fiction and nonfiction, camouflaging themselves as “histories” and “tales of truth.” By the second half of the century, however, the American novel was on a firmer footing: Harriet Beecher Stowe had written a global bestseller; Henry James was embracing the novel as an art form, building an international reputation as “master” of the form, and laying the groundwork for twentieth-century fiction; and Mark Twain was cultivating a status as one of the first literary celebrities. We’ll study writings by these and other novelists, including Kate Chopin, Pauline Hopkins, Charles Brockden Brown, Robert Montgomery Bird, and Susanna Rowson. In addition, we’ll consider how various dominant approaches to American fiction of the past fifty years (from the romance thesis and myth-and-symbol criticism to the New Americanist “postnational” turn) have not only offered competing ways of reading American fiction, but have also changed the body of texts we read, by continually remapping the “center” and “margins” of the American “canon.” Fulfills writing intensive requirement.

 

ENG 330: Literary Theory & Criticism. Morrow (4) TR 9:25-11:07

Study of twentieth and twenty-first century literary criticism and theory, with emphasis on current theoretical trends. Students develop an analytical vocabulary and acquire critical tools with which to read, write, and theorize about literature and other texts. Readings address diverse conceptions of author, reader, text, literary canon, gender, sexuality, race, class, and geopolitics. Prerequisites: ENG 112 and two literature courses at the 200-level, or one 200-level and one 300-level.

 

ENG 344 Restoration/18th C. British Lit. Butler. MW 11:50-1:05

Readings in prose, poetry, and drama of the period, including works by Behn, Swift, Pope, Sheridan, and Radcliffe. Examination of relevant cultural contexts. Fulfills writing-intensive requirement. Prerequisites: ENG 112 or 114 and two literature courses at the 200-level.

 

ENG 379 Waking the Witch. Laity. MW 10.25-11.40.

Where fear and desire meet we find the figure of the witch. From its earliest history cinema has been drawn to the magic and mystery of the witch as a spectacle of both power and horror. We will examine how film both draws from and influences popular notions of the witch as seducer, destroyer, crone and lover. Fulfils writing intensive requirement.

 

ENG 494-01 English Internship. Shavers (4)

This course provides students with the practical experience of applying the knowledge and skills learned in their coursework in actual work environments. Students engage in field opportunities in writing, research, drama, and literature at such sites as newspapers, public relations offices, schools, non-profit organizations, government agencies, theaters, libraries, and other professional contexts. Application required; in the semester preceding the internship, students work with the internship coordinator to find placement and begin the application process. Open to English majors who have completed 90 credits toward their degree. Prerequisites: ENG 112, ENG 330, one 300-level writing course, and at least one 300-level literature course. Students who have completed at least 12 credits toward the writing minor may also apply to take this course.

 

ENG 498-01: Senior Seminar. Dahn. TR 2:30-4:12

In-depth study of a major writer, genre, or literary movement, involving comprehensive readings of primary texts, extensive critical research, oral presentation of research and analysis, and a major paper. Open to English and English-Adolescence Education majors who have completed 90 credits toward their degree. Prerequisites: ENG 112 or 114, ENG 330, one 300-level writing course, and at least one 300-level literature course.

 

 

 

In the News: Dr. Laity

jansson-conference

The English Department’s own Dr. Kathryn Laity will be a keynote speaker later this month at the 20th Anniversary Conference at the Finnish Institute of Japan. The conference focus is Finnish artist Tove Jansson, probably best known as the creator of The Moomins but also a painter and novelist. Dr. Laity’s keynote will be ‘Improvisation is a beautiful word’: Tove Jansson & Living Art Every Day.

Have you got news for us? Be sure to share the word with the English department, students and alumni.

Alumni News: Christina Romeo

Christina Romeo (BA English 17) tells us:

I have been selected as one of the fellows for the Center for Women in Government and Civil Society’s 2019 Women in Public Policy Fellowship. I will be working for the NYS Coalition Against Domestic Violence in January. I will be working on the ground with domestic violence and homeless shelters across the state and will be an advocate for domestic abuse survivors. I will also have the chance to embark on my own research to improve services for LGBTQ+ teens and young adults escaping abusive relationships. I am one of the 400 past Fellows who now hold high ranks of positions in the public service field all over the New York State, across the country, and around the world.

Congratulations on securing such a prestigious fellowship!

Remember, if you have news to share with your fellow students, faculty and alumni, be sure to let us know.

Alumni News: Jessie Serfilippi

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Jessie Serfilippi (MFA Creative Writing 18, BA English 15) has some news for us:

I’m excited to share news of my upcoming publication. My essay, “Under the Cover of Breeches and Bayonet,” is being published this November in the forthcoming anthology, Fierce: Essays by and about Dauntless Women, published by Nauset Press. I will be taking part in a reading for the anthology on December 15th at Soho20 Gallery in Brooklyn, from 2-4pm.

Any news to share with the English Department community? Use the form to share your updates about publications, jobs, fellowships, awards, etc.

Alumni News: Juliet Barney

Barney JJuliet Barney (MFA Creative Writing 15, BA English 12) is happy to announce that her story, “If It Wasn’t For Winston, I Wouldn’t Smoke,” appears in New York’s Emerging Writers: An Anthology of Nonfiction, compiled and edited by Z Publishing House. Congratulations!

Any news to share with the English Department community? Use the form to share your updates about publications, jobs, fellowships, awards, etc.

#MondayMotivation: Patricia Highsmith

“I create things out of boredom with reality and with the sameness of routine and objects around me.”

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Patricia Highsmith

Image via The Guardian

NEW: Digital Publishing Minor

IMG_9242

Rationale for the program:

Publishing is now mostly prepared digitally even when the outcome is a printed book, magazine or newspaper. Beyond the traditional publishing world, many businesses and organizations now handle their own publishing needs in-house, presenting their work to the world via an integrated platform that includes websites, blogging and multiform social media support. Students will learn the basic skills of digital publishing to pursue work writing and editing for a variety of content providers and marketing outlets.

Required courses (14-15 credits):

ENG 115 Intro to New Media

4

or
ENG 116 Professional Writing

4

ENG 253 Intro to Digital Publishing

4

ART 110 Two-Dimensional Concepts

3

CSC 112 Fundamentals of Comp Science

3

or
CSC 202 Intro to Programming

4

Choose one course from the following:

ENG 206 Creative Writing

4

ENG 251 Nonfiction Writing

4

ENG 252 Writing for Digital Media

4

Choose one course from the following:

The 300-level course should be taken after completing ENG 206, ENG 251, or ENG 252.

ENG 311 Wrtg Creative Non-Fiction

4

ENG 312 Writing Poetry

4

ENG 313 Writing Fiction

4

ENG 314 Script Writing

4

ENG 315 Professional Writing & Editing

4

ENG 317 The Art of the Essay

4

ENG 381 Periodical Studies

4

ENG 253: Intro to Digital Publishing

This course will introduce the processes of digital publishing with an emphasis on practical skill building. Students will survey the history of the book as a technology for information, examine the typical requirements for copy editing at a professional level, then work through the basic steps of producing a simple ebook including attention to design and layout. Prerequisite: ENG 105 or equivalent. (L05)