Tag Archives: essays

English Club: Books & Brews / ENG 218 Poetry Reading

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This Thursday at 5:30 pm in Albertus 369, English Club will be holding their last meeting of the year. We will be reviewing on this past semester and this past year, talking about ways that we can improve the club for next year.
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The Art of the Essay’s Virtual Visiting Author

saint-rose-logoOver at the CSR Chronicle a piece on English professor Jennifer Marlow inviting an author for a virtual visit with students:

Author Lacy M. Johnson, who wrote “The Reckonings,” which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism, virtually visited Wednesday with English 317-The Art of Essay class via Skype, for a Q&A session.

College of Saint Rose professor, Jennifer Marlow, invited Johnson to offer insights to her student writers. “Since she is a writing teacher herself, I know that she will be able to converse with and offer practical advice to student writers,” said Marlow.

Read the rest here.

ENG 252: Here’s to the first-generation college students!

Screen Shot 2019-03-27 at 1.47.48 PMBy Amanda Famigletti

College is a scary phase in life. It consists of parents cosigning on loans you’ll be paying until you’re 35. Maybe stepping away from your hometown to a big city at 18. And everyone’s favorite part of the transition, a non-virtual game of Tetris to figure out how to fit every last article of clothing, piece of furniture and miscellaneous items to squeeze into a 10 x 10 home for the next year. It’s the biggest academic endeavor you have yet to face, and it’s far from easy.
However, there is a certain population of students in particular that I’d like to shout out to. It’s the first-generation students.
The term can be simply defined as an undergraduate whose parents did not attend university. Research suggests that first-generation college students differ in the sense of their counterparts such that they are typically not as active in extracurricular activities, and can even be less academically prepared. This ties to less satisfaction in college, and without academic or social support, could potentially drop out of college. However, the amount of first-generation college students enrolled in college is rapidly increasing, and this is something we should be proud of.
I am saying this because I too am a first-generation college student, and it makes me so incredibly proud to be one because it shows that there is hope despite one’s circumstances. I encourage everyone who is in the same shoes as me to find the courage to seek out help from professors. Your academic success is most important to them and they are always there to help.
Try and create a social circle as well. Keep up with information about new clubs that may interest you, join a study group, anything that you feel may help. These are key components to your academic success.
I would never say it is easy, but it is worth it. Take a step back and look at where
you are right now. You’re probably studying for your upcoming midterm, chugging coffee late at night to write your term paper or watching Netflix for some down time. Regardless, you are on the path to where you need to be and will get there soon. So, take a deep breath, pat yourself on the back and be proud to be a first-generation college student.
For additional information, here is a blog post from Psychology Today called “What We
About the writer:  Amanda Famigletti is a senior at the College of Saint Rose, currently studying Psychology.
[The students in ENG 252 are writing blog posts highlighting campus and community events and opportunities.]

Writing Help is Here!

CSR Prose Guide Cover
Final exam time is nearly upon us: many struggle with research papers and best writing practices. The Strose Prose Guide to College Writing 2018-19 is here to help you through the process of writing and integrating your research with skill. It includes examples of student papers as well as guidelines to work through the process of composing a solid paper for a variety of disciplines and genres.

Employers Want English Majors!

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Department Chair David Morrow emailed a link to this article at CBS News pointing out that employers want English majors more than business majors — and other “problematic majors” have high under- and unemployment rates. Among the reasons are:

majors are aimed at preparing students for specific fields…are failing to graduate “job ready” adults, the researchers said. Students in these majors may not be learning communication and critical thinking skills, which means they may lack the writing and reasoning abilities that employers want in new hires.

Communication and critical thinking are key for the job market as well as for the study of literature and writing.

Check out the full piece here.

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Faculty Works in Progress 11/12 with Jennifer Marlow and David Morrow

AfternoonTalk 11 12 SLIDE

In the News: Dr. Laity

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The English Department’s own Dr. Kathryn Laity will be a keynote speaker later this month at the 20th Anniversary Conference at the Finnish Institute of Japan. The conference focus is Finnish artist Tove Jansson, probably best known as the creator of The Moomins but also a painter and novelist. Dr. Laity’s keynote will be ‘Improvisation is a beautiful word’: Tove Jansson & Living Art Every Day.

Have you got news for us? Be sure to share the word with the English department, students and alumni.