ENG 252: Author Aisha Saeed Visiting Albany

Aisha Saeed-1.jpg

One of my professors shared an announcement about an author visiting Albany that I thought a lot of students would be interested in. Author Aisha Saeed will be coming to Albany on Wednesday, November 6th. She is going to be giving a talk at 7 pm at the Albany Public Library on Washington Avenue.

Aisha Saeed is an author of young adult and children’s books. She is going to be a part of The New York State Writers Institute’s “Visiting Writers Series” promoted by The University at Albany. It is an exciting event because Saeed is a New York Times bestselling author and has released Far From Agrabah this year as part of Disney’s Aladdin franchise. Saeed is a great author to have visit Albany because of her contribution to the diverse experiences among members of the community.

Aisha Saeed is a Pakistani-American writer and helped start a nonprofit organization called We Need Diverse Books. The organization’s website says that it aims to advocate “essential changes in the publishing industry to produce and promote literature that reflects and honors the lives of all young people.”

I think a lot of Saint Rose students could benefit from attending this author talk at the Albany Library. It’s also very close to campus and free! It is certainly relevant for any English majors and education majors. Aisha Saeed’s perspective on the positive changes being made in literature will be inspiring to hear since she is one of the authors making an impact. She is an advocate for education and empowerment of females. Her contribution to children’s books with strong female protagonists sends young girls the message that they are worthy and capable of achieving anything in life. For more information about Aisha Saeed and the details about the event, click here for the page that my professor shared with my class.

About the writer: Meghan Tompkins is a junior at The College of Saint Rose who is majoring in Early Childhood Education and Childhood Education.

ENG 252: Saint Rose Students Participate in Climate Change Strike

IMG_0829What do you call home? By definition, it’s “the place where one lives permanently, especially as a member of a family or household”. However, home can be a place, person, object, or anything that makes you feel complete. But all of these things exist upon one thing: Earth.

September 20-27 consisted of what is known as the Global Week for Future. This was a series of international strikes and protests to demand action be taken to address climate change. A record of 7.6 million people, mostly led by youth and students, took to the streets to strike for climate action. All around the world, in cities and villages, big and small, millions joined hands and spoke up in defense of the climate.

The College of Saint Rose students gathered together to prepare for the strike by creating signs and chants. Friday, September 20th, these students joined hands with the University of Albany as well as Albany High School to march all the way to the state Capital and strike together as one. Hundreds more joined, including students from Siena, Skidmore, and Union. As they marched to the Capitol, students chanted things such as “If we’re standing up for our environment, what do we do? STAND UP, FIGHT BACK!”

This is all in an effort to show that overall, through the community and Government, we have the people power necessary to fight climate change and end the era of fossil fuels. According to the NASA website, if climate change persists, the Northeast and Capitol Region will experience heat waves, heavy downpours, sea level rise, growing challenges, and more. It is up to us to fight prevent these results now before it is too late. Saint Rose students and more are doing just that.

About the Writer: Jennifer Moss is a Junior at the College of Saint Rose studying
Communications with a concentration in Public Relations and Advertising.

English Club: Books & Brews / ENG 218 Poetry Reading

Screen Shot 2019-04-29 at 9.04.47 AMScreen Shot 2019-04-29 at 9.05.22 AM

 

This Thursday at 5:30 pm in Albertus 369, English Club will be holding their last meeting of the year. We will be reviewing on this past semester and this past year, talking about ways that we can improve the club for next year.

Visiting Scholar: John Keene

Jersey City, NJ. Sept 18th 2018. John Keene writer shot in and around Jersey City for the John D. and Catherine T. Macarthur Foundation.
Photo via MacArthur Foundation

John Keene: ‘Counternarratives’

7 pm April 24th
Carondelet Symposium, Lally Hall, 3rd Floor

We are delighted to host 2018 MacArthur fellow John Keene as our visiting scholar for the 2018-9 academic year. He will be speaking the evening after our department symposium (beginning at 9am in Midnight Eats). From the MacArthur Foundation press materials:

John Keene is a fiction writer exploring the ways in which historical narratives shape contemporary lives while simultaneously re-envisioning these narratives from the perspectives of those whose voices have been suppressed. Through innovations in language and form, he imbues with multifaceted subjectivities those who have been denied nuanced histories within the story of the Americas—primarily people of color and queer people—and exposes the social structures that confine, enslave, or destroy them.

His first book, Annotations (1995), is simultaneously a semi-autobiographical novel chronicling the coming of age of a black, queer, middle-class child in the 1970s and ‘80s in St. Louis and a collection of essays about the ideological, philosophical, and political contexts that define his struggle to achieve agency. In the story collection Counternarratives (2015), Keene reimagines moments, both real and fictional, from the history of the Americas, adopting the language and literary forms of the time periods in which his characters live—from seventeenth-century epistolary novels to Modernist and post-modernist experiments with stream of consciousness.  One story, “Gloss on a History of Roman Catholics in the Early American Republic,” is framed as an excerpt from a history book. As the text unfolds, it is revealed that what at first appears to be a footnote about the disappearance of a convent school in early nineteenth-century Kentucky is in fact the eyewitness account of Carmel, an enslaved girl who achieves literacy and a literary voice within the space of the work. “A Letter on the Trials of the Counterreformation in New Lisbon,” also narrated by an enslaved person, turns a letter between missionary priests into an assertion of queer African presence in the New World. In “Rivers,” Keene imagines two meetings between an older Huckleberry Finn and a now-free Jim; he endows Jim with a voice and consciousness, thereby presenting Tom Sawyer and Huck from a powerful new perspective that extends and transforms Twain’s original novels.

In his fiction and in a number of other projects spanning translation, poetry, and cultural criticism, Keene is correcting and enlarging our distorted, partial views of American history and culture, and challenging his readers to question received understandings of our past.

BIOGRAPHY

John Keene received an A.B. (1987) from Harvard University and an M.F.A. (1997) from New York University. Before joining the faculty at Rutgers University-Newark, where he is currently professor and chair of the Department of African American and African Studies and a professor in the Department of English, he taught at Brown University and Northwestern University, among other institutions. He was a member of the Dark Room Collective and is a graduate fellow of Cave Canem. In addition to his novels, he has published two collaborative volumes of poetry, Seismosis (2006) and GRIND (2016), a chapbook of poems, Playland (2016), and translated Brazilian author Hilda Hilst’s novel Letters from a Seducer, from Portuguese. His writing has appeared in TriQuarterly, the Kenyon Review, and Ploughshares, among other journals.

The Art of the Essay’s Virtual Visiting Author

saint-rose-logoOver at the CSR Chronicle a piece on English professor Jennifer Marlow inviting an author for a virtual visit with students:

Author Lacy M. Johnson, who wrote “The Reckonings,” which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism, virtually visited Wednesday with English 317-The Art of Essay class via Skype, for a Q&A session.

College of Saint Rose professor, Jennifer Marlow, invited Johnson to offer insights to her student writers. “Since she is a writing teacher herself, I know that she will be able to converse with and offer practical advice to student writers,” said Marlow.

Read the rest here.

English Club Meeting Thursday!

English Club LogoHey Everybody,

English Club will be holding a meeting this Thursday, April 11, at 5:30 pm. We will be answering any last minute questions about elections, and we will also be playing around with more writing prompts.
Here are some upcoming events to keep in mind:
4/12- STROSE SLAMS AND BAKE SALE (see attached flyer) @ 8 pm Campus Theater- Perform a song, poetry, a monologue, or whatever else you have in store in an open, accepting space. We will also be selling baked good in order to benefit our club. COME SUPPORT!
4/16 @7:30pm, Albertus 303- ENGLISH CLUB E- BOARD ELECTIONS- come out and vote for who you want to see on the e-board of English Club for the 2019-202 academic year!
4/17 BLAZE PIZZA FUNDRAISER ( see attached flyer) 6-9pm, Blaze Pizza Stuyvesant Plaza- Come out and grab some food, show a flyer (either on a phone or a printed out flyer) and donate 20% of the proceeds of your meal to our club!
If you have any questions or have any ideas for events, feel free to reach out to me via email!
Thanks,
Sam Zimmerman
English Club Vice President
Screen Shot 2019-03-20 at 8.16.47 AM
Screen Shot 2019-04-09 at 1.18.14 PM

Faculty Works in Progress: Eileen Sperry and Robert Shane

Screen Shot 2019-04-01 at 11.58.00 AM